Object ID: 2014.2.8.1
Object Name: Found photograph_4

Object ID: 2014.2.8.1

Object Name: Found photograph_4

Object ID: 2014.2.7.1
Object Name: Found photograph_3

Object ID: 2014.2.7.1

Object Name: Found photograph_3

Object ID: 2014.2.5.1
Object Name: Found photograph_2

Object ID: 2014.2.5.1

Object Name: Found photograph_2

Object ID: 2014.1.30.1
Object Name: Found photograph_1
Finding photographs can be a strange phenomenon. I am not so much disturbed (if that is the right word) by encountering images of strangers, but think it might have something to do with finding other people’s valuable property. Value which in my mind potentially increases with the age of the object. So it has happened that in Third Ward, I have found several photographs and even whole albums of photographs. This experience often places me in an emotional quandary. From my perspective it is obviously it is a great find, but simultaneously there is a sense of loss which takes place on numerous levels: the first being the loss of the object, the second being the loss of life, or property which precludes the discarding of such items, and the last being the loss of memory, or experiential evidence for the owner, or the ones they left behind.

Object ID: 2014.1.30.1

Object Name: Found photograph_1

Finding photographs can be a strange phenomenon. I am not so much disturbed (if that is the right word) by encountering images of strangers, but think it might have something to do with finding other people’s valuable property. Value which in my mind potentially increases with the age of the object.

So it has happened that in Third Ward, I have found several photographs and even whole albums of photographs. This experience often places me in an emotional quandary. From my perspective it is obviously it is a great find, but simultaneously there is a sense of loss which takes place on numerous levels: the first being the loss of the object, the second being the loss of life, or property which precludes the discarding of such items, and the last being the loss of memory, or experiential evidence for the owner, or the ones they left behind.

Object ID: 2013.12.31.1
Object Name: Club Pladium_1
Not enough has been said about the prominence of Third Ward as a cultural hub that vitalized the city of Houston. One of the area’s popular nightspots during the 1960’s was Club Pladium. It was located in an area of Third Ward that was once known as “Sugar Hill”, and some very popular performers graced its stage, such as the great Etta James (see poster above c.1968), Sam & Dave, Ramsey Lewis, the Bar-Kays, etc.
Club Pladium is now the location of Ralston Discount Beverages.

Object ID: 2013.12.31.1

Object Name: Club Pladium_1

Not enough has been said about the prominence of Third Ward as a cultural hub that vitalized the city of Houston. One of the area’s popular nightspots during the 1960’s was Club Pladium. It was located in an area of Third Ward that was once known as “Sugar Hill”, and some very popular performers graced its stage, such as the great Etta James (see poster above c.1968), Sam & Dave, Ramsey Lewis, the Bar-Kays, etc.

Club Pladium is now the location of Ralston Discount Beverages.

Footnote to: Object ID: 2013.12.27.1

Object Name: Houston Informer Newspaper c.1968, Message to Our Folks
View the above video at:
https://diva.sfsu.edu/collections/sfbatv/bundles/208083
I think there is a link between the sentiments displayed in Object ID: 2013.12.27.1, and the ideas put forth by Bobby Seale in the video linked above. Both try to face the issue of Black Popular culture and demand more from it/envision a better future for it. In one case an educational request, and in the other an economic one. Regardless, it appears to me that in the present moment this kind of critical engagement with the force of Black Popular Culture is lacking, but is greatly needed!

Footnote to: Object ID: 2013.12.27.1

Object Name: Houston Informer Newspaper c.1968, Message to Our Folks

View the above video at:

https://diva.sfsu.edu/collections/sfbatv/bundles/208083

I think there is a link between the sentiments displayed in Object ID: 2013.12.27.1, and the ideas put forth by Bobby Seale in the video linked above. Both try to face the issue of Black Popular culture and demand more from it/envision a better future for it. In one case an educational request, and in the other an economic one. Regardless, it appears to me that in the present moment this kind of critical engagement with the force of Black Popular Culture is lacking, but is greatly needed!

Object ID: 2013.12.30.2

Object Name: Phylicia Rashad

Jack Yates Senior High School Alum class of 1966.

wreckamic:

Phylicia Rashad (Allen) = STUNNING

(via purpro)

Object ID:2013.12.30.1

Object Name: KTSU memory_1

I first heard this track by Gil Scott on Third Ward’s own KTSU FM 90.9, c.1993. During those days they had a phenomenal group of DJs!

themaninthegreenshirt:

Lady Day And John Coltrane by Gil Scott Heron

Ever feel kinda down and out, you don’t know just what to do
Livin’ all of your days in darkness let the sun shine through
Ever feel that somehow, somewhere, you’ve lost your way
And if you don’t get help quick you won’t make it through the day
Could you call on Lady Day,
Could you call on John Coltrane
Now ‘cause they’ll
They’ll wash your troubles
Your troubles your troubles
Your troubles away!

Plastic people with plastic minds are on their way to plastic homes
No beginning there ain’t no ending just on and on and on and on and on, it’s
All because they’re so afraid to say that they’re alone
Until our hero rides in, rides in on his saxophone.
Could you call on Lady Day,
Could you call on John Coltrane
Now ‘cause they’ll,
They’ll wash your troubles,
Your troubles, your troubles
Your troubles away!

Ever feel kinda down and out, you don’t know just what to do
Livin’ all of your days in darkness let the sun shine through
Ever feel that somehow, somewhere, you’ve lost your way
And if you don’t get help quick you won’t make it through the day
Could you call on Lady Day,
Could you call on John Coltrane
Now ‘cause they’ll,
They’ll wash your troubles,
Your troubles, your troubles
Your troubles away!

Object ID: 2013.12.27.1
Object Name: Houston Informer Newspaper c.1968, Message to Our Folks
An interesting message that appeared in the Entertainment section of the Houston Informer.

Object ID: 2013.12.27.1

Object Name: Houston Informer Newspaper c.1968, Message to Our Folks

An interesting message that appeared in the Entertainment section of the Houston Informer.

Unity Foto Bank is organized by Jamal Cyrus and Ray Carrington III as part of PRH’s Round 39: Looking Back, Moving Forward. This artist project seeks to collect, organize, and disseminate a photographic history of events, sites, and individuals integral to the culture of Houston's Third Ward.

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